Malin’s Moroni

Los Angeles Temple Moroni – Brian Olson
Sculptor
Milard F. Malin
Commissioned
1951
Material Welded Aluminum covered in 22 karat gold leaf
Height 15’ 5.5”(4.7 Meters)
Weight 2,101 pounds(953 kilograms)
Currently On
1 temple

This Angel still resides on the Los Angeles California Temple

Angel in the City of Angels

Cyrus Dallin creating the iconic Angel Moroni statue for the Salt Lake Temple did not begin the practice of placing a statue on every temple. Five temples would be built and dedicated as well as sixty-two and a half years would pass before another Angel Moroni Statue would be placed on a temple. This second statue, while keeping the horn and the upright position of Dallin’s Statue, would be as distinct from the Salt Lake Statue as that statue was from the Nauvoo weather vane.

As construction commenced on the Los Angeles California Temple in 1951, Millard F. Malin was contacted by the Church about creating a new statue to go atop the new temple in a prominent California neighborhood. Designed specifically for the Los Angeles California Temple, Malin’s Moroni is one of a kind. According to the sculptor, the style was heavily influenced by the Book of Mormon paintings of Arnold Friberg, especially in regards to clothing and muscle tone.

Besides the clothing, often described as Mayan in style, this 15 foot tall statue has two other features not used on any other Moroni Temple Statue to date. First, the manner that the right hand holds the trumpet with the palm upturned and the trumpet resting in the hand. All other versions of the statue currently in use have the left hand palm down with a firm grip on the trumpet. Second, unlike all the other versions of the statue currently in use on temples which feature bare feet, this statue wears sandals.

This is also the first of two statues to be created for use on top of temples where the statue is holding Gold Plates in the crook of his left arm, the first of only two statue models in use to do so.

The Los Angeles Temple Moroni was still not the start of the tradition of angels on the temples. More time would pass and more temples would be built before another Angel would be placed upon a temple.


References

Scott Lloyd “‘Another Angel’” ldschurchnewsarchive.com 20 September 2008
J. Michael Hunter “I Saw Another Angel Fly” Ensign, January 2000.
Ardis E. Parshall “The Angel Moroni’s Secret” keepapitchinin.org, 30 April 2009.
Jack Sun “A Sacred Witness to All Men” The Instructor, Vol. 91 no. 3 p73-74
“The Nugent, Malin and Millis Families” rootsweb.ancestry.com, 17 January 2009
Wendy Kenney “Looking Up to Moroni” New Era, November 2009.
“Angel Moroni Statues on LDS Temples” mormonnewsroom.org..

Moroni2

Features

Distinctive Garb

Brian Olson

The cloak, belt, and headband convey Mayan culture as understood from the era the statue was sculpted.

Gold Plates

Brian Olson

This Angel Moroni holds a reproduction of the Gold plates from which the Book of Mormon was translated, nestled in the crook of his left arm.

Upturned Palm

Brian Olson

This is the only Moroni statue that holds the trumpet in an upturned right palm, rather than with the right hand wrapped around the trumpet.

Sandals

Brian Olson

In addition to the distinctive clothing, this is currently the only Moroni on temples that is not barefoot.

 


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