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    • Dedication
    • 1999 Bismarck North Dakota Dedicated
    • Moroni
    • 2009 Angel Moroni placed upon the Kyiv Ukraine Temple

Fairbanks’s Moroni

Washington DC Moroni – Brian Olson
Sculptor
Avard T. Fairbanks
Commissioned
1971
Material Cast bronze covered in 23 karat gold leaf
Height 18’ (5.5 Meters)
Weight 4,000 lbs (1814.4 kilograms)
Currently On
1 Temple

This Angel is in use on the Washington D.C. Temple

Sculptor
Avard T. Fairbanks
Commissioned
~1978
Material Cast bronze covered in gold leaf
Height 15’ (4.6 Meters)
Weight 4,000 lbs (1814.4 kilograms)
Currently On
3 Temples

This Angel still resides on the Seattle Washington Temple, Jordan River Utah Temple, and Mexico City Mexico Temple

Third Moroni, An Ensign to the Nations

The Los Angeles Temple Moroni was still not the start of the tradition of angels on the temples. The third temple to have an angel statue was the large new temple built in the U.S. Capital, Washington D.C.

In the 18 and a half years between the Los Angeles and Washington D.C. Temple dedications, the Church returned to the practice of building temples without statues. Five Temples would be built and dedicated without an angel statue atop them.

For this new temple, the Church would contact multiple artists to invite them to submit designs for a new statue to go atop the temple. Of the eight submissions the church received, they would choose the design of Avard Fairbanks.

Avard Fairbanks’s Angel Moroni is the only temple statue that has the trumpet pointing the same direction as the feet. All other statues have the trumpet and head turned at a right angle to the chest and feet.

Like Malin’s Moroni, this angel holds a reproduction of the Gold Plates that the Book of Mormon was translated from nestled in the crook of his left arm. The robes on Fairbanks’s Moroni are long, longer than on any other Moroni. They cover part of the feet, well below the ankles. Most Moroni Statues have the robes end about or above the ankles.

This statue was also the first to be used on more than one temple. Originally, just an 18 foot statue (from feet to crown) for the Washington DC Temple was commissioned. Later three 15 foot versions were made to be used on other temples. The Washington DC statue is still the tallest Angel Moroni in use when measured from feet to crown.


References

Scott Lloyd “‘Another Angel’” ldschurchnewsarchive.com 20 September 2008
J. Michael Hunter “I Saw Another Angel Fly” Ensign, January 2000.
“Temple Statue Ready” pB-1, Deseret News, October 10, 1979.
Wendy Kenney “Looking Up to Moroni” New Era, November 2009.
“Angel Moroni Statues on LDS Temples” mormonnewsroom.org.

Features

Direction

Brian Olson

This is the only Angel Moroni Statue that has the trumpet pointing the same direction as the feet. All other statues have the trumpet and head turned at an angle to the right from the chest and feet.

Gold Plates

Brian Olson

Like the Los Angeles Moroni, this Angel Moroni holds a reproduction of the Gold plates that the Book of Mormon was translated from nestled in the crook of his left arm.

Below the Ankles

Brian Olson

The robes on this Angel Moroni are so long they cover part of the feet. Most Moroni Statues have the robes coming to about the ankles.

Loose Grip

Brian Olson

The left hand on the Fairbanks statue holds the trumpet in a loose grip, the fingers extended and the pinky under the trumpet instead of over.

 


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