This Day In History

    • Announcement
    • 1998 Columbus Ohio Temple Announced
    • Dedication
    • 1993 San Diego California Temple dedicated
    • Ground Breaking
    • 1877 Ground broken for Manti Utah Temple
    • 1922 Ground broken for Mesa Arizona Temple
    • 2015 Ground Broken for Star Valley Wyoming Temple
    • Moroni
    • 2015 Angel Moroni Placed on Star Valley Wyoming Temple

Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple

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Mountain Birds with Traquet TarrierJulien Nicolas
many_fountainsPooleside

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Early Video

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Originally rendered January 11, 2007

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Rendered 6 April 2007

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Rendered 1 January 2007

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Early Video 2

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Rendered 26 June 2007

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Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple Wiki

Description

The Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple is a temple located in South Jordan, Utah, a suburb of Salt Lake City. The Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple serves approximately 83,000 Latter-day Saints living in the western Salt Lake Valley.

 

History

Announcement

Church President Gordon B. Hinckley announced on October 1, 2005, that the Church was planning to build on property in the west area of the valley. He delivered the announcement in general conference, a worldwide gathering during which Church members learn from their leaders. At that time, Utah had 11 temples, and the construction of one more temple in Utah had been announced a year earlier. “You may ask why we favor Utah so generously,” President Hinckley said. “It is because the degree of activity requires it.”[1]  He also noted that a site had been acquired for a fifth Salt-Lake-area temple in the southwest part of the valley, which has been set aside for a future announcement.[2]

Planning and Approval

On Tuesday, November 28, 2006, the South Jordan Planning Commission wholeheartedly approved plans for the temple, which drew rave reviews from city staff and zero public comment.[3] Plans called for a 60,000-square-foot building with 63-foot high walls and a single spire reaching 193 feet (58.83 metres) heavenward, topped by the traditional gold-leafed angel Moroni statue.[4]

Groundbreaking

On December 16, 2006, President Hinckley presided at the groundbreaking ceremony.[5] Despite freezing temperatures, hundreds gathered in a temporary structure set up for the morning meeting. At the groundbreaking President Hinckley announced the official name of the temple as the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple. It has been previously called the South Jordan Utah Temple.[6] However, to avoid confusion with the Jordan River Utah Temple, the official name was chosen to reflect the Oquirrh Mountain range Patrons “won’t know how to spell it,” he said to laughter from the crowd, “but they don’t come to the temple to spell. They come to participate in the work of the Lord.” Although the name may seem strange to some, “people don’t know how to spell Timpanogos, and some can’t even spell Salt Lake City,” he quipped.

Construction

Original renders of the Oquirrh Mountain Temple showed a spire clad in green oxidized copper.
During construction the country experienced a shortage in copper. This caused the cost of copper to steadily start to rise. This in turn caused thefts of copper wiring from construction sites, abandoned buildings, and even street lights. (In Salt Lake County a couple miles of I-15 had the wiring stolen from the large lights on the freeway in 2013, 4 years after the temple dedication. The lights were dark for several days before anyone realized what had happened. ) Due to the shortage the spire of the temple was redesigned to be clad in the same stone as the rest of the temple.

Open House

When a temple is completed, the Church invites members of the community to tour the beautiful interior by hosting an open house. The open house of the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple drew more than 600,000 visitors from June 1 to August 1, 2009.[7]

On June 13, 2009, the spire was struck by lightning during a thunderstorm. The statue of the angel Moroni was tarnished, and was replaced on August 11, 2009.[8]

Dedication

On his 82nd birthday, Church President Thomas S. Monson participated in a cornerstone ceremony that symbolically completed the temple. The crowd gathered for the cornerstone ceremony spontaneously sang him a birthday song.

For the first time in Utah’s history, church was cancelled statewide on August 23, 2009, to allow members to attend the dedication of the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple without conflict.

President Monson gave the dedicatory prayer to hallow the building as the house of the Lord. He offered a prayer of gratitude for Jesus Christ, who is the focal point of temple worship, saying, “We praise His holy name. His atonement gives purpose to our being and turns our thoughts heavenward.” President Monson also prayed that temple teachings “will be as a never-failing beacon of divine light to guide our footsteps and keep them constantly on the pathway of eternal life.”[9]

The temple was dedicated in nine sessions from August 21 to 23, 2009. More than 14,000 Church members attended the sessions at the temple, and many more watched a satellite broadcast of the services from designated meetinghouses.

Dedicatory Prayer

Dedication Order

South Jordan was the first city in the world to have two temples, The Oquirrh Mountain Utah and the Jordan River Utah Temples. The Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple was the 130th temple in the world, the 65th in the United States, the 13th temple built in Utah and the 4th built in the Salt Lake Valley. Other temples in the Salt Lake Valley include the Salt Lake Temple (1893), the Jordan River Utah Temple (1981), and the Draper Utah Temple (2009).

 

At the time of the dedication of the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple there were 7 other temples under construction, 9 temples awaiting groundbreaking, and 2 temples undergoing renovation.

Under Construction Awaiting Groundbreaking Under Renovation
Cebu City Philippines Tegucigalpa Honduras Laie Hawaii
Vancouver British Columbia Gilbert Arizona Atlanta Georgia
Quetzaltenango Guatemala Phoenix Arizona
Manaus Brazil Calgary Alberta
San Salvador El Salvador Cordoba Argentina
The Gila Valley Arizona Kansas City Missouri
Kyiv Ukraine Philadelphia Pennsylvania
Rome Italy
Trujillo Peru

Presidents

Temple President Years Served
President Ken B. Asay 2015–
President A. Roger Merrill 2012–2015
President Alan S. Layton 2009–2012

The temple is a 60,000 square-foot edifice situated on a 12-acre plot in southwest Salt Lake Valley, built on a bluff on the edge of the Daybreak Community;[10][11]. Oquirrh (pronounced “oh-ker”) is a Goshute Indian word meaning “shining mountains,” a fitting allusion to a temple, which is also known as the “Mountain of the Lord.” The beautiful Oquirrh Mountains form the western boundary of the Salt Lake Valley.[13] The property was donated to the church by Kennecott Land, a portion of a company that mines copper and precious minerals from the Oquirrh Mountains, just a few miles west of the temple. From the site, visitors can see the other three temples in the valley: the Draper, Jordan River and Salt Lake temples. Lined with walkways, the picturesque temple grounds are open to the public for strolls around this magnificent House of the Lord. An adjacent meetinghouse welcomes visitors for worship services on Sundays.

Exterior

Cladding

The cladding on the exterior of the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple is Uinta gold granite, light beige granite quarried and milled in China.

Windows

Breathtaking art-glass windows sparkle on the temple exterior. They contain stars and circles, encouraging patrons to lift their thoughts heavenward. The density of the star pattern increases as the windows ascend.

Symbolism

Inscriptions

There is one inscription on the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple. It is on the east face, half way up the spire of the temple. The text is engraved into the stone and painted black.

HOLINESS
TO THE
LORD

THE
HOUSE
OF THE
LORD

 

Cornerstone

The cornerstone of the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple is on the south east corner of the temple, facing east. The text of the cornerstone is engraved into the stone and painted black.

ERECTED
2009

Spires and Moroni

Spire

The Temple features a single stone spire 193 feet (58.83 metres) (59 m (193.57 feet)) high, topped by a 9-foot (2.7 m (8.86 feet)) statue of the angel Moroni.

Moroni

The spire of the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple was installed atop the temple on July 11, 2008, immediately followed by installation of a gold-leafed statue of the angel Moroni.

Lightning struck the angel Moroni statue atop the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple on Saturday afternoon, June 13, 2009, during the public open house. The powerful bolt of lightning blackened Moroni’s trumpet, arm, and face. A replacement statue was installed on August 11, 2009, 10 days before the dedicatory services began.

Interior

Within the 60,000-square-foot Oquirrh Mountain Temple are a baptistry; a celestial room, which represents eternal life with God; instruction rooms; and sealing rooms, where temple patrons can be married for eternity.

The ordinance rooms in the Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple feature murals painted by artists who were called as “art missionaries” for the Church.

Temple architecture and furnishings were carefully considered and chosen for the atmosphere they would create for patrons. Materials from all over the world decorate the stunning interior, including wood from the German Alps, Kentucky and Indiana, along with limestone from Morocco and Egypt. Sealing rooms have crystal chandeliers, and the beautiful centerpiece of the temple’s celestial room is a 15-foot-long chandelier made of nearly 20,000 pieces of Swarovski crystal.

Individuals and Contractors

Architect  Naylor, Wentworth Lund Architects
Project Manager
 Russell S. Tanner
Contractor  Okland Construction

Sources and Links

External links

Additional Articles

Sources/Citation

  1. [1]Gordon B. Hinckley, “Opening Remarks,” Ensign, Nov. 2005, 5.
  2. [2] The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints News Release, “New Salt Lake Valley Temple Announced,” 1 Oct. 2005
  3. [3] Jared Page and Carrie Moore, “S. Jordan planners OK temple,” Deseret News 1 Dec. 2006, 1 Dec. 2006 .
  4. [4]“LDS plan fourth S.L.-area temple,” Salt Lake Tribune 2 Dec. 2006, 12 Dec. 2006 .
  5. [5]Moore, Carrie A. (December 17, 2006). “Ground broken for LDS temple”. Deseret News. Retrieved October 15, 2012.
  6. [6]Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple information”. Church News. August 29, 2009. Retrieved October 15, 2012.
  7. [7] “News Story”, Newsroom, LDS Church, January 31, 2009, retrieved October 15, 2012
  8. [8]Taylor, Scott (August 11, 2009), “Moroni statue replaced at Oquirrh Mountain Temple”, Deseret News, retrieved October 15, 2012
  9. [9]Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple dedicatory prayer, in Church News, Aug. 29, 2009
  10. [10]Hinckley, Gordon B. (November 2005), “Opening Remarks”, Ensign, retrieved October 15, 2012
  11. [12]
  12. [11][12] “News Story”, Newsroom, LDS Church, October 1, 2005, retrieved October 15, 2012
  13. [13]The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints News Release, “Groundbreaking Held for Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple,” 16 Dec. 2006.

 

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