This Day In History

    • Announcement
    • 1838 Far West Temple Announced
    • 2008 Gilbert Arizona Temple Announced
    • 2008 The Gila Valley Arizona Temple Announced

Nuku’alofa Tonga

Video and Model Details

Video

Video

Audio

“A forest on the island” originalmaja

Technical

Modeled: 2.x
Render: Cycles

Whole Scene

Vertices:
Faces:
Objects:
File Size:

Temple Only

Vertices:
Faces:
Objects:
File Size:

 Renders

Nuku’alofa Tonga Temple Wiki

Description

The Nuku’alofa Tonga Temple (formerly the Tongan Temple) is the 25th constructed and 23rd operating temple. Tonga has more Mormons per capita than any other nation in the world. Forty two percent of the population are members of the Church. The Nuku’alofa Temple serves more than 45,000 Mormon members in the Tongan islands.  It is located in the middle of Tonga’s main island Tongatapu near Matangiake. The area where the temple is located is commonly known as Liahona, after the name of the church-owned high school there. The temple is several miles south of its namesake city, the capital Nukuʻalofa. The Tonga temple is very busy, staying open six days a week and even all night on the last Friday of every month so that all who want to attend have the opportunity. This is in part because of the Tongan people’s respect for their ancestors and interest in family history work.

History

Announcement

On April 2, 1980 the Mormon Church announced that a temple would be built in Nuku’alofa Tonga.

Groundbreaking

A groundbreaking ceremony and site dedication were held on February 18, 1981. President of the Church at the time, Spencer W. Kimball presided at the ceremony and gave the dedicatory prayer. Tonga’s king, Tauga’ahau Tupou IV attended the ceremony. Labor missionaries who volunteered their time from New Zealand and other South Pacific Islands did most of the construction of the temple.

Open House

The Nuku’alofa Tonga Temple was open to the public for tours July 19th through the 30th 1983.

Dedication

Gordon B. Hinckley dedicated the temple in 7 sessions held during 9-11 August 9-11 1983. [1][2]

Dedicatory Prayer

Dedication Order

Renovation

The temple was closed for renovation in July 2006.[3]

Open House

After completion, an open house was held September 29 to October 20, 2007. Approximately 40,000 people toured the temple during the 19 day open house, an average of 2,105 per day.[4]

Rededication

The temple was rededicated on November 4, 2007 by Russell M. Nelson over 2 sessions.[5][2]

Presidents

Temple President Years Served
President Taniela A. Langi 2016–
President Samisoni Uasila’a 2013–2016
President Pita F. Hopoate 2010–2013
President Eric B. Shumway 2007–2010
President M. Veuki Kaumatule 2001–2007
President Sione M. Fineanganofo 1998–2001
President ‘Uiha Tu’ikolouatu 1995–1998
President Tevita Ka’ili 1992–1995
President Patrick D. Dalton Jr. 1990–1992
President Semisi N. Tonga 1987–1990
President Tonga T. Paletu’a 1983–1987

Those who toured the 14,572 square foot temple were able to see the exterior, walk the grounds of the five acre temple site, and see the interior which includes two ordinance rooms, three sealing rooms, the Celestial room, and baptistery, as well as other facilities needed to carry out ordinances according to Mormon beliefs. The temple is the only one in Tonga, and has a floor plan similar to other southern Pacific temples, including the Apia Samoa (rebuilt in 2005) and the Papeete Tahiti temples.

The temple was built on a 5-acre (20,000 m2) plot, has 2 ordinance rooms and 3 sealing rooms, and has a total floor area of 14,572 square feet (1,353.8 m2).

Loto Road, Liahona
Nuku’alofa, Tongatapu
Tonga

Width

Official
Meters   35.05 [calculated]
 Feet   115
Estimated
[Sat Image measuring tools]
 Meters  
Feet  

Length

Official
 Meters   60.96 [calculated]
 Feet   200
Estimated
[Sat Image measuring tools]
 Meters  
 Feet  

Official Area

Meters   1968.06
Feet   21,184

Exterior

Cladding

Windows

Symbolism

Inscriptions

Cornerstone

Spires and Moroni

Spire

Moroni

Sculptor
Version
Placed
Faces
Height
Feet
Meters

Interior

 Baptistry, two ordinance rooms, celestial room, three sealing rooms

Individuals and Contractors

Architect    Emil B. Fetzer
Project Manager    Richard Westover and Richard Roley
Contractor  Utah Construction & Development.
Architect 2005  Naylor Whentworth and Lund Architects
Project Manager 2005
Alan Rudolf
Contractor 2005
 Cabella Construction

 

Sources and Links

External links

  • LDS.org(official)
  • MormonTemples.org (official)
  • MormonNewsroom.org (official)
  • LDSChurchTemples.com
  • LDSChurchNewsArchive.com
  • Wikipedia

Additional Articles

Sources/Citation

  1. [1] “Utah’s People of Color; Significant Events in the Ethnic Communities of Utah”. Salt Lake Tribune. 27 December 1998. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  2. [2] “LDS church rededicates Tonga temple”. Salt Lake Tribune. AP. 5 November 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2017.
  3. [3]“Press release”, Newsroom, LDS Church, 2007-07-10, retrieved 2012-10-07
  4. [4]“Open House in Tonga Attracts 40,000 Visitors,” Ensign, February 2008.
  5. [5]Weaver, Sara Jane (2007-11-05), “LDS Tonga Temple rededicated”, Deseret Morning News, retrieved 2012-10-07

Social and Sharing

Comments

So empty here ... leave a comment!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sidebar