Bogotá Colombia

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One of my Wife’s friends is married to a man who served in Bogotá Colombia. He took 3 pictures from the open house of the temple that he gave me copies of. I made this whole model from 3 photos. Not to shabby. The original model of The Bogotá Colombia Temple was, once again, a Google Earth destined low poly model.

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Modeled: 2.63
Render: Cycles

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Vertice Icon Vertices: 28,406

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File size Icon File Size: 4.3

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Modeled: Blender 2.49
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Model Details

There are a few issues with this model. Most of them stem from the fact that there is so little in the way of reference for this temple. I don’t have the engraving, and I did a poor job picking out and texturing trees. Next model will have to be better.

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Vertices: 308
Faces: 356
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File Size:439kb

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Description

the Bogotá Colombia Temple serves Latter-day Saints living in stakes (similar to dioceses) within Colombia.

Before the completion of the Bogotá Colombia Temple, Colombian Latter-day Saints who wished to participate in temple worship traveled to temples elsewhere in South and Central America. Even with the completion of the Bogotá Colombia Temple, some Colombian temple patrons travel up to 22 hours by bus to attend.

History

The first meetinghouse had been built less than a decade before, in 1975. (For Latter-day Saints, temples and meetinghouses serve different functions.) 18 years after the first Mormon missionaries arrived in Colombia the temple was announced.

In the meantime, Church membership had begun to blossom in Colombia. By the time Colombia’s second temple was announced for Barranquilla in 2011, Church membership had reached 173,000.

Announcement

The Bogotá Colombia Temple was first announced 7 April 1984 by President Gordon B. Hinckley.

The site was announced by the First Presidency four years later on 28 May 1988. Another 6 years would pass before the Groundbreaking finally commenced construction.

Groundbreaking

Ground was broken for the Bogotá Colombia Temple on 26 June 1993 by William R. Bradford of the Seventy, then president of the South America North Area. Attendance was limited to a small group of regional representatives, mission and stake presidents and Church employees and their spouses. [1]

Elder Bradford mentioned in his groundbreaking prayer, “This site is the center of a beautiful valley that has a long and important history. Thousands of thy children have lived and died here. This valley and cities that have existed here for centuries have been the center, even the capital, of a civilization that has extended for many hundreds of miles in all directions, and has had a great influence both for good and evil over the lives of thy children.

“Now as we break ground to construct the temple here, we know that we are doing a sacred work. We know that this will be the most important building ever constructed in this valley. We know that the work to be done in this holy temple will bring peace and salvation. It will bind up the wounds and give hope to the oppressed. It will reach back through generations of time and seal up the dead unto thee and thy salvation.”

In his address, Elder Davila, a native of Colombia and a councilor in the area presidency, pondered the sweep of history leading up to the start of a temple.

“I think of the great number of people and the many years that have been necessary for the arrival of this moment,” he said. “And I do not refer to the past 30 years when the Church first arrived in Colombia.

“I see much farther in the past through time and space to the pre-existent life, the creation of the world and the first altar in the Garden of Eden, and the passing of all the dispensations.”

At the time of the ceremony Bogota became the third temple currently under construction worldwide, joining Orlando Florida and Bountiful Utah Temples. Seven other temples were then awaiting groundbreaking.

Construction

Those that worked on the temple who were not members of the Mormon Church gave special care to the project. As time progressed, workers developed a reverence and respect for the building they were constructing. One electrician showed particular faith and determination to complete his responsibilities on the temple. While working on the wiring, he was electrocuted so severely that he received third degree burns on his arms. Brother Aulesita, the temple project manager, described the following incident:

I thought that I would never see the man again. Monday morning he was there and I asked him, “Why are you here?” He responded by saying, “Because we have not finished our work in the temple.” I was very touched. He is a nonmember and he feels that he needs to complete the job and needs to do it well. I watched him as he went to work with his arms burned, covered with bandages, and in a great deal of pain. I then made the comment that because of his faithfulness that he would not have any problems recovering. A couple of months later his bandages were off and he barely had any scars. He worked to the last minute. Why didn’t he just quit? I think it is because he felt the Spirit of the temple. [2]

Open House

Latter-day Saints were not the only ones interested in the new structure occupying a beautifully landscaped 3.7-acre lot amid the bustling city. The Bogotá Colombia Temple opened its doors for public tours March 27–April 19, 1999, and hosted 120,000 people of different faiths — 20,000 of whom came in one day, the last day of the scheduled open house. Following the open house, the Bogotá Colombia Temple was dedicated in 11 sessions from April 24 to 26, 1999, with more than 11,000 people participating despite a transportation strike hampering attendance.

Dedication

The temple was dedicated on April 24, 1999, by LDS Church president Gordon B. Hinckley. More than 11,300 members attended the 11 dedicatory sessions. Another 500 or so members were not able to attend because of a transportation strike. Others experienced various problems during lengthy trips by bus to the nation’s largest city of 9 million people. [3]

In his dedicatory prayer, President Gordon B. Hinckley made mention of some of the difficulties Colombian Church members experience living in their troubled nation: “May peace reign in the land and the noise of conflict be silenced. May Thy work roll on without hindrance and may Thy servants, whose message is one of peace, be protected and guided in their ministry.”[4]

Dedication Order

The Bogotá Colombia Temple was the fifth temple built in South America and the first built in Colombia.

It is the 57th temple built by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the first temple in Colombia. The Bogotá Colombia Temple was the fifth temple built in South America and the first built in Colombia.c A second Mormon temple in Colombia was announced in 2011 and will be built in Barranquilla to help serve Colombian Church members.

Detail

Location

The Bogota Colombia Temple is ten miles from downtown Bogota, in the Niza section. the Bogotá Colombia Temple stands amid the nation’s biggest city.

Exterior

Much of the design and craftsmanship was done by Colombians.


The temple’s Brazilian granite exterior glistens in the sunlight and is subdued in rain, its grayness harmonizing with mists around it. [5]

Gordon B. Hinckley, Church president from 1995 to 2008, was especially impressed by the Bogotá Colombia Temple’s stonework. He said, “I have never seen any [stonework] finer, anywhere. It is beautiful, a fitting monument to the good people of Colombia.”[6] President James E. Faust, then second counselor in the Church’s First Presidency, likewise said of the Bogotá Colombia Temple, “It exceeds our expectations — the architecture is extraordinary and the many features of it make it really quite distinct. The beautiful stonework, which is found in the floors and elsewhere in the celestial room, is extraordinary.”[7]

A welcoming portico covers the front entryway on the east side of the temple. Tall stained glass windows are placed along the sides of the temple., the Mormon Temple creates an atmosphere both inside and out of peace, beauty, and tranquility. The temple grounds are landscaped with plants and flowers that are native to Columbia, such as flowering eucalyptus trees with beautiful red flowers.

Interior

Inside the 53,500-square-foot Bogotá Colombia Temple, red-grained wood and a pastel color scheme beautify the rooms. Marble finishes and motifs reminiscent of ancient Incan designs. The celestial room’s crema marfil marble imported from Italy curves gracefully above the doors, counterpoint to a dazzling crystal chandelier. [8]

There are instruction rooms, where temple patrons learn more about God and make promises to live His gospel, and sealing rooms, where marriages are solemnized for both this life and the next, ensuring the continuation of the family unit. The temple also has a baptistry and a celestial room, or a room representative of heaven. An elegant crystal chandelier, imported Italian marble, and impeccable stonework add to the splendor of the celestial room, helping patrons contemplate God’s grandeur.

The Bogota Colombia Temple has a total of 53,500 square feet, four ordinance rooms, and three sealing rooms.

Sources and Citations

Additional Articles


Bogota Colombia Temple: ‘Most beautiful building’ opens doors to public“, Church News, April 3, 1999

Swensen, Jason (March 30, 2002), “LDS Columbians enlist faith amid troubled times“, Church News

Sources

  1. [1]Colombia temple groundbreaking“, Church News, July 10, 1993
  2. [2]“In Many Countries”, ‘The First 100 Temples” by Chad Hawkins, 2001, p. 158
  3. [3] Hart, John L. (May 1, 1999), “Cover Story: Bogota Temple — Gift of inner peace in a troubled land“, Church News
  4. [4] Bogotá Colombia Temple dedicatory prayer, in Church News, May 1, 1999
  5. [5] Hart, John L. (May 1, 1999), “Cover Story: Bogota Temple — Gift of inner peace in a troubled land“, Church News
  6. [6] John L. Hart, “Bogota Temple — Gift of Inner Peace in a Troubled Land, ‘Greatest Event in History of Colombia,’” Church News, May 1, 1999
  7. [7] Hart, “Bogota Temple,”
  8. [8] Hart, John L. (May 1, 1999), “Cover Story: Bogota Temple — Gift of inner peace in a troubled land“, Church News

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