Bismarck North Dakota

Video and Model Details

Video

Another in a long line of Google Earth First Models. Bismarck was easier to model in high detail. The restrictions for Google Earth acceptance make the sunken nature of the Bismark North Dakota Temple hard to represent. But I did it for Google Earth, and I did it here too.

Audio

Summer Woods Woodthrush Julykvgarlic

Technical

Modeled: 2.63
Render: Cycles

Whole Scene

  • Vertices: 24,287
  • Faces: 20,769
  • Objects: 150
  • File Size: 4.4

Temple Only

  • Vertices: 22,158
  • Faces: 18,961
  • Objects: 48
  • File Size: 3.8mb

Simple Model

Model Details

Details

This is a reasonably accurate representation of the Bismark North Dakota Temple created by me for Google Earth.

Technical

Modeled: Blender 2.49
Render: WebGL render engine

Temple Only

  • Vertices: 481
  • Faces: 243
  • Objects: 2
  • File Size: 476 mb

Renders

Description

At the time of its dedication, the Bismarck North Dakota Temple served a geographical area spanning more than 200,000 square miles, with patrons traveling from as far as Minnesota, Nebraska and Manitoba to attend. The Bismarck North Dakota Temple’s remote location demonstrates the Church’s commitment to bring temples to its members wherever they are.

Bismarck is the capital of North Dakota and has the second-highest population of any city in the state, after Fargo.

Church members in Bismarck and surrounding areas are grateful to have a temple in their midst, whether it be large or small. Before the Bismarck North Dakota Temple was dedicated, many members living in the upper Midwest traveled to temples in Denver, Colorado; Chicago, Illinois; and Cardston, Alberta, Canada, to participate in temple services. President Hinckley said of these Latter-day Saints, “Even with the temple here [in Bismarck], some will still have to travel a very long distance, but it will be much shorter than it was before. There is so much faith on the part of the people in these areas. They’re willing to go anywhere to accomplish the temple work.”[1]

History

Church membership in the Dakotas has always been relatively small. The first LDS baptism in North Dakota occurred in 1912. In 1960, there were 904 members. Until the establishment of the Fargo Stake in 1977, North Dakota was the only state in the United States without a Latter-day Saint stake.

The Church purchased land on the northwestern edge of the city in the 1980s and used part of it for a meetinghouse. While serving as both the Church’s district president in Bismarck and Bismarck’s city coordinator, Dan Dahlgren received encouragement to sell the excess land. However, he felt that he should not sell it, and today the Bismarck North Dakota Temple occupies the 1.6 acres Brother Dahlgren kept. [2]

Announced

The Bismarck North Dakota Temple was announced 29 July 1998 by the First Presidency.[3]

Groundbreaking

October usually means cold weather in North Dakota and the day of the new temple groundbreaking was no exception. Elder Kenneth Johnson of the Seventy broke ground for the Bismarck North Dakota Temple on October 17, 1998 despite inclement weather. He told the audience of nearly 1,000 people — some of whom had traveled up to seven hours through heavy rain — that the planned temple in Bismarck “may be smaller than many temples but it will have the power of God and every blessing will be there.”[4]

During the ceremony Bishop McMullin, second counselor in the Presiding Bishopric of the Church, urged members, “As the walls of the temple go up, let your faithfulness go up.” [5]

Members of the Mormon Church were encouraged to be prepared. Elder Holt, an Area Authority Seventy, suggested that while the acronym CTR means, “Choose the Right” to Primary children, it could also mean “Current Temple Recommend,” for adults. He counseled members, “Prepare yourselves … Be ready. Be worthy to serve in the house of the Lord. [6]

Open House

The 10-11 September 1999 Open House of the Bismarck North Dakota Temple drew attention form all over the community of 50,000. Visitors came from far and wide, with 10,267 people attending the open house, some coming back more than once. A writer for a local paper returned the day following the press conference “for personal reasons” she said. She returned a third time with a friend.[7]

One youth in the local ward was asked to write an article for his school paper talking about his membership in the Church, serving a mission, and the temple. [8]

A county commissioner drove around the temple on a Sunday around the time of the open house and remarked that even sitting in their car they “felt like we should whisper”.[9]

Dedication

On September 19, 1999, President Hinckley dedicated the Bismarck North Dakota Temple. North Dakota was the only state he had not previously visited at that time.[10] In his prayer, President Hinckley said,

“We thank Thee for the faith of Thy sons and daughters in the vast area of this temple district, men and women who love Thee and love their Redeemer, and have stood steadfast as Thy people. They have felt much alone. They are out on the frontier of the Church. Their numbers are still not large. But they are entitled to every blessing which the Church has to offer, including the ordinances here administered.

“May they come here frequently. Wilt Thou bless them for their efforts and reward them for their faith. Watch over them and keep them from harm and trouble in the long distances many will still travel.”[11]
As these midwestern Mormons drive many miles through ice and cold to attend the nearest temple, they both rely on God’s care for physical protection and anticipate receiving spiritual fortification in the temple for the journey ahead.

Dedication Order

It is the 61st temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the first temple to have been constructed in the Dakotas, serving Church members from North and South Dakota.

Presidents

Details

Location

Not far from the banks of the mighty Missouri River, the Bismarck North Dakota Temple stands in elegant simplicity on windswept plains.

Exterior

Its exterior resembles those of dozens of temples constructed in the late 1990s and early 2000s as part of a streamlining effort to bring temples closer to more Church members.

The Bismarck North Dakota Temple’s exterior is finished in a granite veneer from Quebec. Circular designs decorate the temple’s exterior above some of the windows, and circles appear in the stained glass, which was imported from Germany.

Bismarck is the capital of North Dakota and has the second-highest population of any city in the state, after Fargo.

Church membership in the Dakotas has always been relatively small. The first LDS baptism in North Dakota occurred in 1912. In 1960, there were 904 members. Until the establishment of the Fargo Stake in 1977, North Dakota was the only state in the United States without a Latter-day Saint stake.

Symbolism

Inscription

The Bismark North Dakota Temple has Three engravings.

The first is on the East side of the temple above the windows. It is carved into the stone and painted black.

HOUSE OF THE LORD
HOLINESS TO THE LORD

The second is above the main entrance, carved into the stone and painted black as well.

HOUSE OF THE LORD ◊ HOLINESS TO THE LORD

The third is in the single transom window above the doors. It is etched into the glass.

HOUSE OF THE LORD
HOLINESS TO THE LORD

Moroni

Topping the spire, a gold-leafed statue of the angel Moroni raises his trumpet, sounding the message of the gospel to all. The statue faces east, silhouetted against lovely prairie sunrises.

The statue was placed 10 June of 1999. The statue is a fiberglass replica of LaVar Walgreen’s 1997 statue, which is 5′ 10″ in height and holds a scroll in its left hand.[12]

Interior

At 10,700 square feet, the Bismarck North Dakota Temple has a relatively small floor plan and was the sixth small-scale temple to be dedicated.

By eliminating some features found in larger temples, such as cafeterias for patrons, the Church reduced expenses and thus allowed more Church members to participate in the essential functions of temple worship. Church President Gordon B. Hinckley said of these smaller temples, “I am very grateful for them. They are very efficient and exceedingly well built with the best materials.”[13]

The granite veneer for the temple is from Quebec, the marble is from Italy, the stained glass windows are from Germany and the chandeliers in the celestial and sealing rooms are from the former Czechoslovakia.

Individuals and Contractors

The architect for the Bismarck North Dakota Temple was Ritterbush-Ellig-Hulsing



  1. [1]Gordon B. Hinckley, quoted in Dell Van Orden, “Shortening the Vast Distances,” Church News, Sept. 25, 1999.
  2. [2]Dell Van Orden, “Shortening the Vast Distances,” Church News, Sept. 25, 1999,.
  3. [3]“More Small Temples Announced,” News of the Church, Ensign, October 1998
  4. [4]Kenneth Johnson, quoted in Janet Kruckenberg, “Ground Broken for Two More Temples,” Church News, Oct. 24, 1998.
  5. [5]News of the Church, Ensign, Jan. 1999, 77
  6. [6]News of the Church, Ensign, Jan. 1999, 77
  7. [7]“Bismarck temple open house opening doors to many hearts,” Church News, 18 September 1999.
  8. [8]“Bismarck temple open house opening doors to many hearts,” Church News, 18 September 1999.
  9. [9]“Bismarck temple open house opening doors to many hearts,” Church News, 18 September 1999.
  10. [10]Dell Van Orden, “Well-traveled president visits North Dakota for the first time ever,” Church News 25 Sept. 1999: 3
  11. [11]4 Bismarck North Dakota Temple dedicatory prayer, in Church News, Sept. 25, 1999.
  12. [12]Kruckenberg, Janet (June 19, 1999), “Statue tops temple in North Dakota”, Church News
  13. [13]Gordon B. Hinckley, quoted in Dell Van Orden, “Shortening the Vast Distances,” Church News, Sept. 25, 1999,.

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